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FILIPINOS HAVE TWICE DIABETES THAN NON-HISPANIC WHITES

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By JOSEPH G. LARIOSA
(© 2017 Journal GlobaLinks)

 

CHICAGO (JGL) – While diabetes is the number six killer in the Philippines, Filipino Americans are twice as likely to have diabetes

than non-Hispanic Whites in Hawaii and California, according to a 2015 article published in Journal of Public Health.

In a 2001 study in Texas by the Diabetes Care, 16.1 percent of Filipinos had diabetes compared to the national average of 11.10%.

GROUP PICTURE: 

CONSUL GENERAL Generoso DG Calonge (fourth from left, seated) has a souvenir photo with his guests, Dr. Robert M. Sargis (to his right), endocrinologist of the University of Illinois at Chicago and Jenna Archuleta (second from left, seated), major gift officer of the American Diabetes Association, Deputy Consul General Romulo Victor Israel, Jr. (to Congen’s left), Consul Melchor P. Lalunio, Jr. (extreme left) and Consul Ericka Anna T. Abad (behind Consul Lalunio's right) during the ika-21st Pagkikita sa Konsulado (21st townhall meeting) at the Philippine Consulate in Chicago last Thursday. Among those in photo from left are Anita Saldo, Wenilyn Capote, Mr. & Mrs. Butch Odullo, Ruben Salazar, Anna Liza F. Alcantara, Anong Santos of Pinoy Newsmagazine and Joseph G. Lariosa of Journal GlobaLinks/PM (philamessenger.com) (JGL Photo by Arneil D. Torres of Chicago Philippine Consulate)


These statistics were stressed by Dr. Robert M. Sargis, endocrinologist of the University of Illinois at Chicago, during the Ika-21 Pagkikita sa Konsulado (21st town hall meeting) at the Philippine Consulate last Thursday as the American Diabetes Association was reaching out to the Filipino American community for diabetes prevention.

What makes the treatment of diabetes tricky is that unlike other non-Filipinos, Filipinos with diabetes “are less obese or have lower body weight,” suggesting that Filipinos have “inherent genetic susceptibility” and are diagnosed 8.4 years earlier than non-Hispanic Whites.

Diabetes increases the risk of complications of blindness, amputation, kidney failure and cardiovascular diseases. Onset of diabetes can be delayed if prediabetes or type 2 diabetes is detected early.

A prediabetes or type 2 diabetes is a condition that comes before diabetes. It means the patient’s blood glucose levels are higher than normal but are not high enough to be called diabetes. There are no clear symptoms of prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. One can have it and not know it.

DON’T SUGAR COAT IT: 

PREVENT DIABETES and improve the lives of people with diabetes was the main topic of the outreach program held at the ika-21 Pagkikita sa Konsulado (21st town hall meeting) at the Philippine Consulate in Chicago conducted by Dr. Robert Sargis (center), endocrinologist of the University of Illinois at Chicago, and Jenna Archuleta, major gift officer of the American Diabetes Association in Chicago. (JGL Photo by JOSEPH G. LARIOSA)


Dr. Sargis said prediabetes or type 2 diabetes can be delayed by “losing 7% of body weight or exercising 150 minutes a week, decreasing sugar in diet and taking medications that will control diabetes so 'people will develop less eye disease, less kidney disease, less amputation; and what has been not clear if we are aggressive in taking the two medications developed during the last 12-18 months, do we prevent heart attacks and strokes and prevent from dying?'” 

LATEST DIABETES MEDICATIONS 

The two medications are liraglutide (Victoza) and empagliflozin (Jardiance).

He said those with diabetes do not just get cardiovascular disease, they also develop cancer. Those taking Metformin reduces breast cancer risk while insulin shots can now be done thru “insulin pump, which communicates with a sensor,” which “intervenes less as the machine is going to do (pump) the insulin for the patient by itself.”

SARGIS SPEAKS: 

DR. ROBERT SARGIS, endocrinologist of the University of Illinois at Chicago, points out that diabetes increases the risk of complications of blindness, amputation, kidney failure and cardiovascular diseases. Onset of diabetes can be delayed if prediabetes or type 2 diabetes is detected early. He made the presentation during the ika-21 Pagkikita sa Konsulado (21st town hall meeting) at the Philippine Consulate in Chicago last Thursday. (JGL Photo by JOSEPH G. LARIOSA)


Dr. Sargis said he had a friend with Type 1 diabetes who developed an insulin pump when blood sugar level is low as a result she was able to sleep thru the night and she was not stressed by her five-year-old child getting low blood sugar and not having something terrible happening to the child like a seizure.”

Another resource speaker, Jenna Archuleta, major gift officer of the American Diabetes Association in Chicago, invited members of the Filipino American community to come up with a research project that will “study under any group or name or company that you care to fund. It would be centered on Filipino. If you want to further designate it that it is something that the ADA is flexible if people have specific problem that they worry about and can talk about to alleviate that worry.”

Ms. Archuleta said ADA will sponsor such project starting at $50,000.

WITH SPEAKERS: 

DR. ROBERT SARGIS (center), endocrinologist of the University of Illinois at Chicago, and Jenna Archuleta, major gift officer of the American Diabetes Association in Chicago, Illinois have photo op with journalist Joseph G. Lariosa of Journal GlobaLinks/PM (philamessenger.com)  after Dr. Sargis and Ms. Archueleta conducted an outreach for diabetes prevention among Filipino American community in the Philippine Consulate in Chicago Thursday during the ika-21 Pagkikita (21st town hall meeting). (JGL Photo) 


She is also inviting health care providers who care for people with diabetes to attend an International Education Program in San Diego, California between June 9 and 13, 2017, which discusses “Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes” and “Scientific Sessions.”

Ms. Archuleta said is also urging the Filipino American community to look for sponsors, who could host a five-year diabetes educational program in the Philippines like the international diabetes education programs wrapping up in Vietnam and Indonesia. Funding for such program runs between $600,000 and $800,000 “that would truly help Filipinos the world over and make a huge difference and reverberate for generations.”

Ms. Archuleta also asked Filipino Americans to join an advocacy group to raise a “powerful national and local voice for people with diabetes by going to the U.S. Congress in Washington, D.C. between March 29-31 next month calling to improve access to affordable quality health care for everyone with diabetes, fight discrimination, promote policies, among them inclusion of expensive medicine in the medical insurance coverage that prevent diabetes.”

Expenses for this lobbying effort will be shared by the ADA and the advocate. 

“UNITY IN THE COMMUNITY” 

She is also inviting the Fil Am community in the “Unity in the Community” to join the Health and Wellness EXPO, a community-based outreach attended annually by 10,000 people, who may put up a resource exercise for $2,500 for a booth or sponsor a cultural area to deliver speech, explain their advocacies for $10,000 in this family event that will be held on April 8, 2017 at McCormick Place in Chicago’s Southside.

STEP UP THE PLATE: 

 

JENNA ARCHULETA, major gift officer of American Diabetes Association, invites Filipino Americans to join an advocacy group to raise a “powerful national and local voice for people with diabetes by going to the U.S. Congress in Washington, D.C. between March 29-31 next month calling to improve access to affordable quality health care for everyone with diabetes, fight discrimination, promote policies, among them inclusion of expensive medicine in the medical insurance coverage that prevent diabetes.”

Expenses for this lobbying effort will be shared by the ADA and the advocate. She made the call during the ika-21st Pagkikita sa Konsulado (21st town hall meeting) at the Philippine Consulate in Chicago, Illinois last Thursday. (JGL Photo by JOSEPH G. LARIOSA)

 


Ms. Archuleta is also inviting the Fil Am community to a Diabetes Prevention Program, a16-week, free curriculum to help those diagnosed with pre-diabetes. It has a specialized life coach who meets once a week for two hours with a class size of 20 people. Afterwards, there are nine weeks of follow up with an individual coach and by the end, loses eight percent of weight and UK’s hemoglobin A1c levels and indicator with general health blood sugar that is lower.

“We could absolutely do a specialized Fil Am diabetes prevention program in any location and language that work for you with high start up cost but after that could be repeated as many times and that project is about $85,000.”

She said ADA is sponsoring a “Camp Power Up” pilot program for African Americans in the Chicago’s south and west sides with children with pre-diabetes and their families. It will be five-day camp about nutrition, wellness and exercise that hopefully will lead to happy healthy life if they learn techniques.

She added that if there is interest and high obesity among the Filipino community among the youth, “we can do a Fil Am Camp Power Up! and improve the lives of the Filipino descents.”

IPANGAKO (MAKE A PLEDGE): 

IPANGAKO (make a pledge) was presented at the ika-21st Pagkikita sa Konsulado (21st town hall meeting) at the Philippine Consulate in Chicago, Illinois last Thursday to coincide with the Philippine National Autism Week (Jan. 16-20). (JGL Photo by JOSEPH G. LARIOSA)


During the Pagkikita, there was also an announcement by Deputy Consul General Romulo Victor M. Israel, Jr. of the observance of National Autism Week (Jan. 16-20) highlighted by the passage of such laws as Magna Carta for Disabled Persons, Equal Employment Opportunity Act and Anti-Bullying Act.

Consul Melchor P. Lalunio, Jr. urged the Filipino community to register and vote. He also announced the outreach programs in Louisiana on June 28, 2017 and in Missouri and Mississippi and preparation for the holding of the 119th Philippine Independence celebration on June 12, 2017.

Consul General Generoso D.G. Calonge delivered the welcome remarks.

The economic cost in treating diabetes in the U.S. is likely to exceed $300-billion a year. There is an estimated of 415-M people who have diabetes globally and the cost will rise to $642-B in 2040. About 2.5% of rural population in the Philippines has diabetes; 6.8% in urban areas and 8.4% in Manila. There are 3.5-M cases of diabetes in the Philippines. (Contact reporter: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Cmd+Click or tap to follow the link" ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy9847 + '\'>'+addy_text9847+'<\/a>'; //--> )

 

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